STEM learning takes place in so many ways outside of the classroom. Whether you’re out of school on break or just looking for fun experiments to learn a little more about science, here are some great resources to explore. Many experiments can be completed using everyday objects you already have at home! Reminder, always get permission from an adult before doing any experiments at home.

Want to be part of this project? You can be a guest scientist and submit your own video! Click to learn more >

Follow along with this At-Home Science Experiment as Alli teaches us how to make water walk. Who ever said you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? This experiment touches on the subject of capillary action, explaining how a liquid can flow opposing forces like gravity. Talk about going against the tide! This experiment is suitable for all ages.

Download Laboratory Protocol

Materials You Will Need:

  • 5 glasses of Equal Height
  • Food Coloring
  • Spoon
  • Paper Towels
  • Water

Do you think that a piece of paper can hold up a book? What about ten books? What about thirty books? Well, in today’s experiment we’re going to test the strength of different geometric shapes by seeing how much weight they can hold!

Download Laboratory Protocol

Materials You Will Need:

  • Three sheets of construction paper (or other paper)
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Small books

You may be familiar with the sour taste of a lemon but have you thought about why its tangy flavor packs such a sour punch?  Lemons are sour because they contain citric acid which is a weak organic acid found in many citrus fruits like oranges, lemons and limes.

In this At-Home Science experiment you will use red cabbage juice as a pH indicator to determine whether certain liquids are an acid or a base.  Red cabbage juice is usually a deep dark purple color but it turns red when added to an acid or green when added to a base. Red cabbage juices is the best known edible pH indicator in your kitchen but there are many safe fruits, vegetables and flowers that change color in response to acids and bases such as eggplant, beets, blueberries, cherries, onion, raspberry, grape juice, turmeric, and even tomatoes!  Use the laboratory protocol to text some common household solutions to determine if they are an acid or a base.

Download the laboratory protocol for this activity >

Materials You Will Need

  • Red cabbage juice (see instructions)
  • Water
  • Pot
  • Six clear glasses
  • Funnel and coffee filter
  • Paper and pencil
  • Pitcher to hold red cabbage juice
  • Some combination of the following (at least four are recommended):
    • Baking soda
    • Lemon or lemon juice
    • Seltzer water (any flavor)
    • Ammonia
    • Alka-Seltzer antacid tablets
    • Sugar
    • Vinegar, clear
    • Egg

In this At Home Science video Ali tells you about the motion of the ocean: waves! Follow along as she describes the science behind waves and how they play a role in your everyday life! Don’t go surfing the net anywhere else, stay tuned for a fun-filled marshmallow experiment that’ll show you how to make your own wave at home.

Materials You wil Need:

  • 2 soup cans or glasses
  • Tape
  • Mini Marshmallows
  • Toothpicks

Follow along as Education Outreach Coordinator, Rubi, shows us how to blow up a balloon WITHOUT using your own carbon dioxide! This experiment is suitable for all ages and demonstrates a chemical reaction. So buckle up, and get ready to float away to a land of science and wonder.

Download the handout for this activity >

Materials You Will Need:

  • Balloon
  • Water Bottle
  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • Funnel
  • Measuring Cups

In this At Home Science experiment we’re showing you how to put your cat-like reflexes to the test. Watch as Kristin and Michael demonstrate three different ways to test your reaction times with only a ruler and a buddy. Compare averages with your friends to settle the age-old question: Who is the fastest? Or, rope your family members into trying their hand at this experiment and make it a competition, loser has to do the dishes!

Are you dye-ing to know how your favorite candy gets its’ bright color? Well, you’re in luck! In this At Home Science experiment Tori shows us how to do just that in this candy chromatography experiment. Learn about how chromatography works by testing out your favorite colored candy or try it with different objects around your house and let us know about the results!

Materials You Will Need:

  • Colored Candy such as Skittles or M&Ms
  • Coffee Filter
  • Tin Foil
  • Water
  • Two Glasses
  • Salt
  • Mixing Bowl
  • Measuring Spoons
  • Tape, Tape Measure
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Wooden Craft Sticks
  • Coffee Stir Rods

Three, two, one… BLAST OFF! That’s right, in this at home science experiment Benedetta is going to teach you how to create a balloon rocket in your own home by harnessing the power of Newton’s Third Law of Motion. For every action, ____________. Don’t know the ending? Sounds like you’re just going to have to watch the video to find out!

Materials You Will Need:

  • Tape
  • Balloon
  • String
  • Straw

Do you know how soap cleans your hands? In today’s at home science activity Shania demonstrates how soap changes the surface tensions of water, mimicking how soap kills the germs that make us ill.

Materials you will need:

  • Dish soap
  • Toothpick
  • Small bowl + water
  • Black pepper

We at Learning Undefeated are all about that bass, no treble (so long as there’s some science snuck in along the way). That’s because in today’s At Home Science video, James shows you how to make a speaker out of paper plates! Get ready to move and groove to the sound of your favorite tunes; this project helps to explain how speakers work, and how sound travels.

Materials You Will Need:

  • Paper Plates (3)
  • Round Magnets (4)
  • Hot Glue Gun
  • Wire Strippers
  • Magnet Wire
  • Tape
  • Gator Clips
  • AUX cable

Desurae is back and better than ever! Join her and two special guests as they teach us how to make a reaction in a bag. CAUTION: fun will be had, science will be learned, and messes WILL be made. Set up an outdoor laboratory and enjoy the weather while you examine the properties of a chemical reaction!

Materials You Will Need:

  • Baking soda
  • Plastic Bags (sandwich-size or larger)
  • Napkins
  • Food Dye
  • Vinegar
  • Tablespoon
  • Measuring Cup
  • Warm Water

Follow along as Alli shows us how to make a sand dune at home! This experiment is suitable for all ages and demonstrates a process called “saltation”. If you like the beach, this is the lab for you.

Materials You Will Need:

  • Paper Bag
  • Cardboard Box (that will fit inside the paper bag)
  • Fine-grain Sand
  • Hair Dryer
  • Metric Ruler
  • Safety Goggles
  • Mask or Face Covering
  • Marker

You won’t bee-lieve your eyes! Follow along as guest presenter Dr. Mary Stapleton from Towson University Center for STEM Excellence teaches us all about mason bees and how to create your very own beehive at home! So, take a minute to stop and smell the roses, but make sure to watch this video first.

Materials You Will Need:

  • Block of wood
  • Drill

Join along as resident songbird Ali teaches us how to make music out of a few glasses of water! This experiment explains soundwaves and how they can be manipulated to create a beautiful melody. A project that lets you make music while also learning cool science facts is music to our ears!

Materials You Will Need:

  • 4 identical glasses/jars
  • Metal utensil (fork, spoon, knife)
  • Water
  • Sharpie
  • Tape
  • Food Dye (Optional)

Make fun and funky interactive milk art with our guest scientist of the day: Chris Syperski from Verizon wireless! In this video you will learn about surface tension when two chemicals mix and the reactions they create! Suitable for grades K-12 (adult supervision recommended for younger ages). Special thanks to our volunteer presenter for sharing your project with us!

Materials You Will Need:

  • Milk
  • Dish Soap
  • Bowl
  • Food Coloring
  • (Optional) Sprinkles/Glitter
  • Mixing Utensils

In this At Home Science Experiment Education Team Lead Benedetta shows us how to use a balloon and some household snacks to demonstrate the presence of charged atoms. This simple experiment only takes a few minutes and can be done on all kinds of household items! Even if you aren’t good atom; these experiments are an easy way to learn something new and have some fun while doing it. Try this at home and tag us @LearningUNDFTD on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Materials You Will Need:

  • Balloon
  • Crispy Rice Cereal

In today’s At Home Science experiment, Joe teaches about surface tension. This experiment is ideal for grades K-6 and teaches viewers about how water molecules are attracted to each other, forming hydrogen bonds.

Materials You Will Need:

  • Plate
  • Dish soap
  • Water
  • Q–Tips
  • Cardboard
  • Scissors
  • Penny or other space change
  • Eyedropper

In today’s At Home Science experiment, Kristin teaches how to complete the Stroop Test. This project lets you test your brain and see how it functions This experiment is appropriate for grades 6-12 and teaches viewers about how the brain focuses on one subject at a time along with how one brain may differ from another.

Materials You Will Need:

Today’s experiment takes place in the kitchen, where we uncover the chemistry of bread baking. Students will learn about the process of fermentation, what yeast is and how it can be used to cause bread to rise. And, bonus: the activity comes with a tasty recipe for pizza dough too!

Materials You Will Need

  • Two identical water bottles
  • Warm water (1 cup)
  • Two identically sized balloons (ideally two different colors)
  • Sugar
  • Measuring spoons
  • Funnel
  • Yeast (2 packets or 4.5 teaspoons)

Janeé’s Easy Homemade Pizza Dough

makes 2 pounds of dough (enough for two, 12-inch pizzas)

  • 2 packets active dry yeast (4.5 teaspoons)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 ¼ cup warm water (110 degrees Fahrenheit)

Combine yeast and water in a large bowl, mix and let stand until frothy (about 10 minutes). Whisk sugar, oil and salt into yeast mixture. Add flour and stir well until a sticky dough forms. Turn out onto a floured counter and knead for about 7 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. To knead, press your hands away from you along the counter, then fold the dough back over itself and rotate a quarter-turn, then repeat.

Transfer to a well-oiled bowl and let rise until doubled, about one hour. Divide the risen dough into two pieces of equal sizes, form into a ball and let rest 15 more minutes. Press the dough out onto a floured surface to form a 12-inch circle. Gently transfer to a pizza pan or cookie sheet covered with parchment paper. Cover with ½ cup sauce, toppings of your choice, and shredded mozzarella. Top with a sprinkle of Italian herbs and crushed red pepper if you like. Bake in a 400-degree oven for 12-15 minutes until crust is golden.

topping ideas

  • Pepperoni: tomato sauce, pepperoni, and mozzarella cheese
  • BBQ chicken: barbeque sauce, shredded chicken, cooked bacon, diced onions, and mozzarella cheese
  • Vegetarian: tomato sauce, diced bell peppers, diced pineapple, mushrooms, broccoli florets, mozzarella cheese
  • Hawaiian: tomato sauce, diced ham, diced pineapple, mozzarella cheese, and a drizzle of BBQ sauce
  • Get creative! Brush crust with melted butter and add scrambled eggs, cooked sausage, and cheddar cheese for a breakfast pizza!

Follow along as Education Program Coordinator, Alli, shows you how to make a tried-and-true science experiment at home: A DIY Volcano! And no, it will not be life-sized, but it will be satisfying! All you need is a few ingredients from your pantry, and a willingness to make a mess (and clean it up of course). This experiment is suitable for grades K – 12, parental supervision is recommended for younger ages. Have you been trying our experiments at home? Let us know! Tag @LearningUNDFTD on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook and show us your take on at home experiments. For more at-home resources, visit learningundefeated.org/athomescience

Materials You Will Need:

  • Flour
  • Salt
  • Cooking Oil
  • Water
  • Food Coloring
  • Baking Soda
  • Water Bottle
  • Dish Soap
  • Baking Dish

In this video Desurae shows you how a chemical reaction can lead to a fantastic foamy creation big enough for an elephant! Using household materials, this project takes ten minutes and the results are mesmerizing. This experiment is suitable for grades K-12, parental supervision is advised. Try it at home and let us know how it goes, tag @LearningUNDFTD on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook!

Materials You Will Need

  • Active Yeast
  • Food Coloring
  • Water
  • Cup
  • Dish Soap
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Utensil
  • Water Bottle
  • Plate
  • Napkin/Paper Towel

In today’s At Home Science experiment, Andrew teaches how to make instant ice with just a few materials. This project lets you create instant ice with a water bottle in your freezer. This experiment is suitable for grades K-12 and teaches viewers about molecules along with the properties of matter.

Materials You Will Need:

  • Water bottle
  • Freezer

In this video Education Coordinator Gaby shows us how to do our DNA Extraction activity from home. This experiment is suitable for grades 5 – 12, parental guidance is advised. Using just a few simple steps, you will be able to extract DNA from organic material lying around your house! Use different samples and let us know how it works by tagging us @LearningUNDFTD on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Materials you will need:

  • Food (such as fruit, vegetables, or even meat… you can put it in your blender!)
  • Salt
  • Dish Soap
  • Baking Soda
  • Water
  • Isopropyl Alcohol
  • Plastic Bag
  • Cup
  • Spoon (Tablespoon)

This 4-ingredient project is an easy and fun way to learn about how oil and water interact. The experiment demonstrates hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds, using their reaction to create a work of art. It’s suitable for grades K-12. Follow along with Kate as she creates a DIY Lava Lamp!

Materials you will need:

  • Oil
  • Alka-Seltzer Tablets
  • Water
  • Cup
  • Food Dye

This 3-ingredient project is an easy and fun way to learn about density. All you need is a little bit of sugar, water, and food dye to create this eye-catching experiment. It’s suitable for grades K-12. Follow along with Jackie as she creates the rainbow!

Materials you will need:

  • Clear Straw or plastic or glass tube
  • Sugar
  • Warm Water
  • Cups
  • Food Dye

Want to make a bouncy ball? In this video you will learn about chemical reactions by watching how borax (or detergent) interacts with glue and water, and how to create a product you can play with! Suitable for grades K-12 (adult supervision recommended for younger ages).

Materials you will need:

  • Borax or powdered laundry detergent
  • Glue
  • Hot/warm water
  • Cornstarch
  • Teaspoon

Want a fun way to make interactive art? In this video you will learn about chemical reactions by watching how oil interacts with milk, and how to create an exciting new art project that continues to change! Suitable for grades K-12 (adult supervision recommended for younger ages).

Materials you will need:

  • Milk
  • Dish Soap
  • Bowl/Plate
  • Food dye
  • Glitter/Sprinkles (optional)

Have you ever wondered why you feel things touching your skin? In this video, you will learn what neurons are, how they control what you feel, and why different parts of your body react differently to the same stimulus. Science experiments for you to try at home! Suitable for grades 5-12 (younger kids may need help from an adult).

Materials you will need:

  • toothpicks
  • paper or index card
  • tape
  • ruler
  • marker, pen, or pencil

Here are some resources that you can also explore to keep your mind active and to encourage curiosity with STEM. We are updating this page often, so if you have a great resource please email Andrew Courtney and we will add it to this page for other parents and teachers!

Celery Science | Plants need water to survive and they draw water up from their roots through their capillaries. The capillaries are hollow and act a lot like a straw. Adding color to the water helps us visualize this usually invisible process.

Colors of Nature | Think science has nothing to do with art? Think again! Explore the creativity of science through a series of education kits that highlight how art and science work together to help us understand the world.

Discovery Education Viruses and Outbreaks Lesson Starter | Explore resources and instructional materials about viruses and outbreaks. With the recent spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), it is important for students to learn about the science behind viruses and understand individual measures that can be taken to limit exposure and spread. This collection of resources provides timely updates regarding the coronavirus, describes what a virus is and how it spreads, offers an overview of the history of viruses and outbreaks around the world, and reveals essential guidelines for staying healthy.

DIY Robotic Arm | Robotic arm experiment is an easy science experiments for kids that helps us to understand about physics. This project can be great option for 5th grade science fair ideas or it also can be done at home are classroom. You can make this science projects and learn about machines. Materials needed to make this 5th grade science project are a cardboard, string, straw pipe and elastic.

Filament Games | Free computer, tablet, and phone games on topics ranging from fractions to civics.

GeoGabra | GeoGebra is mathematics software for all levels of education that brings together geometry, algebra, spreadsheets, graphing, statistics and calculus in one easy-to-use package

Garbage Science: Crushing a Soda Can & Shrinking Chip Bag | Garbage can be fun to experiment with before it gets thrown away.

Instant Ice | Sharply knock a bottle of supercooled liquid water on the table and it instantly turns to slushy ice before your eyes.

JOVE Science Education Video Library | Extensive video library helps educators reach their student learning outcome goals; covering core concepts to advanced methods and theories. High-impact animations and visualized real-life experimentations enable quick, in-depth comprehension and support blended learning and flipped classroom initiatives. Content can be embedded in courses through most learning management systems or assigned as standalone supplements. Free to educators and students (must request access) through June 2020.

Lava Lamp | Oil and water separate teaching kids about density of liquids in this quick at-home experiment.

Nonstop Fountain | Make a non stop water fountain out of 3 plastic bottles and straws. This really cool self pouring liquid science trick is a great experiment to try at home.

NOVA’s Topic Earth | Parents and children can explore a range of videos from “Ancient Arctic Animals” to “What it is Like to Live in Antarctica.”

Periodic Table Battleship | Kids will be learning chemistry in such a fun way without even realizing it! You’ll love hearing them call out the names of different elements and getting familiar with the structure of the periodic table.

Science Zone App | The NSF’s Science Zone app allows you to navigate hundreds of exciting videos and high-resolution photos from a wide array of science topics.

Scratch | With Scratch, kids can program their own interactive stories, games and animations and share their creations with an online community. In the process, they develop software graphically as a way of learning the fundamentals of coding language.

Skittles Rainbow in a Glass | Skittles are mostly made of sugar. When you add hot water to them, the sugar dissolves and the coloring on the shell of the Skittles turns the water different colors. The cup with only two red Skittles doesn’t have as much sugar as the cup with ten purple Skittles, but they both have the same amount of water. The amount of matter packed into a certain amount of space is called the density of the material. The red water is less dense than the purple water, so it will float on top of the purple water.

Snow Fluff | Tiny pieces of corn starch get mixed into the shaving cream and suspended in the mixture, creating a snow-like texture kids can use to make snowmen and snowballs.

Spark 101 | free 10 MINUTE classroom videos engage students in authentic STEM problem solving.

X-STEM video library | TED-style talks from luminaries of science, designed for middle and high school students.

Water Xylophone | Play your own music using bottles or glasses filled with differing amounts of liquid.

Zooniverse | Researchers, with the help of Zooniverse volunteers, can analyze information more quickly and accurately than when working alone. Zooniverse volunteers, including high school and undergraduate students, even helped researchers discover a new type of galaxy — the Pea Galaxy — named after its small size and greenish color.

Beyond the Bench: STEMulating Career Conversations | Whether you are a student preparing to enter the workforce or a seasoned executive, this podcast is a resource for those with a STEM background seeking to understand career options. Though there are numerous opportunities outside of the laboratory, people either do not know what they are, or how to prepare for the transition. This show is built around non-scripted STEMulating Conversations with those who started out doing laboratory research, then ventured Beyond the Bench to use their skills and experiences in other ways. There will also be discussions spanning a range of technical, interpersonal, and social topics. This podcast can be likened to the ultimate informational interview because it provides answers to the questions you’ve not been able to ask, and addresses areas critical to your professional development which ultimately influences your ability to attain a satisfying and rewarding career.

Beyond the Microscope | Podcast focuses on sharing the voices of women in science, technology, engineering and math fields.

The EdSurge Podcast | A weekly podcast about the future of education, featuring insightful conversations with educators, tech innovators and scholars, hosted by EdSurge’s Jeff Young and other EdSurge reporters.

Fun with the Maryland STEM Festival | Short interviews with the people and organizations that make the Maryland STEM Festival such a success.

Potions Class | Potions Class is a weekly podcast delivering to you a deep dive on easily absorbable topics related to science fields such as health, medicine, research, and development hosted by NIH Post-bacc, Elliot Lowe. Expect thorough research from the “Potions Class” team, as they dig into studies from scientists and experts who have gone before them.

STEM on FIRE – Podcast | About Podcast The STEM on FIRE Podcast targets students thinking about or already pursuing a STEM education by interviewing practicing professionals in the STEM field.

STEM Southwest Podcast | Designed to create STEM connections, cohesion, and elevation within the Southwest region of the United States. You have discovered a place where STEM enthusiasts gather to learn about the amazing STEM rockstars of the region as well as STEM activities that are impacting the world! Whether you are looking to learn more about STEM innovations in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and California you are in the right place! If you have longed to be united with other STEM nerds, then you have found your people here at STEM Southwest! Check out our family-friendly show and events calendar designed to build problem solvers, thinkers, and innovators for the future. New episodes are released every other week.

STEMxm: The STEM Career Podcast | The STEMxm podcast is a show about STEM careers. It is hosted by @MelTheEngineer. Most show episodes will feature a guest interview from a field of Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics and will cover topics such as how to get into that career field, what that path’s education requirements are like, and the interviewees recommendations for being successful in that field or sector. Learn more at www.STEMxm.com.

STEMCAST with Dr. Regan Flower | The STEMcast Podcast is hosted by Dr. Reagan Flowers and is designed to inspire and advance STEM perspectives. Dr. Flowers interviews STEM + Art + Communications professionals from all walks of life and discusses the significance of C-STEM in their professional and personal life.

STEM Everyday | The STEM Everyday podcast focuses on how teachers can infuse STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) into their everyday lessons. We will explore and share great ideas that inspire the students to want to learn while challenging them in the process. It doesn’t matter what subject or grade level is being taught, STEM can be incorporated into all classrooms. This podcast aims to assist teachers in giving students needed opportunities to learn and take charge of their learning, rather than having them acquiring sequestered bits and pieces of content.

Unprofessional Engineering | Interested in science, technology, machinery, engineering and the history behind everyday things? Want a fast and fun way to get your kids interested in STEM? Look no further! We break down a weekly engineering topic in a way that everyone can understand and enjoy.

You’re Hired | In 2018 we conducted a future workforce survey of 1,000 students and only 41% felt prepared for their careers. Many said that more internships, career preparation, networking, career preparation tools, and more access to college career centers would have helped them feel more prepared.To help bridge this gap, we’re proud to sponsor and share our student-centric, on-demand podcast series called “You’re Hired!”. Drawing on experts from around the academic and business community. The series offers practical, real-world preparation and advice on how to succeed in college and ways in which students can get a jump start on their career.